Bill Monroe's
Homeplace
Rosine KY
Home of Bill Monroe
Rosine Kentucky Is the homeplace to many important people
and a place where a man known as "The Father Of Bluegrass"
was born and raised. William Smith Monroe was raised in the small town of Rosine, Ky. on Jersulem Ridge.
At an early age Bill from influence of his mother who played
the mandolin and that was the only thing left for him to play
learned to play the mandolin. Before Bill was born his mother
with her legs swollen and in pain, told her neighbors she played
the mandolin because it helped to releive the pain.
Bill's father, Buck, was a farmer, cattleman, sawmill operator,
coal operator, and hued  cross ties from the farm's virgin tember. 
He was a buck dancer. Bill remembers how he did the Kentucky
backstep.
The name "Bluegrass" came from Bill's home state of Kentucky
and that was the name of his band.  "The Bluegrass Boys"
Birch Monroe, Bill's older brother was 10 years older than Bill
and played the fiddle along with his older brother Speed and
Charlie and Bertha played the guitar.
Charlie and Bill were part of the original Monroe Brothers and
when Charlie and Bill went their seperate ways, Charlie formed
the "Kentucky Partners". Lester Flat worked for Charlie in the
early 1940's before he was hired by Bill. In 1945 when Bill
hired the young Earl Scruggs, with the sound that Earl and
Lester made, Bluegrass was born.
                                  
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Bill Monroe Homeplace after restoration in
Rosine, Ky.
Bill Monroe childhood home place before and during the time it was restored by the  Leatherwood Construction
Company of Tennessee.
It is a great feeling to see the many people who cared
about the man who dedicated his life in preserving the
music that millions of people world wide love and make
part of their life. Thanks to Campbell Mercer who was
instrumental in heading the Rosine Project and to all
that had a great part in making this a reality.

Scroll down below to see the house that was Bill Monroe's
childhood home after it was restored by the
Leatherwood Construction Co. Of Tennessee.
Restored fireplace in the
Bill Monroe homeplace.
Bill Monroe's bedroom
just off living room.
Bill Monroe's F5 Gibson
Was bid on by Campbell Mercer, but wound up in the Country Music Hall of Fame
Click on the picture to listen to
interview about purchase of mandolin 

Real Player is required to listen to
the interview on buying the Bill
Monroe mandolin. If you do not have it
on your computer,  click on the icon above and when the website comes up, click on RealPlayer
in the bar at top of  page,  and when page comes
up, scroll down to left side of page to "Basic 8
our free player" and then download and install
the program and you can listen to the interview.
Bill Monroe Plaque on the
front of the Jamboree Barn
The famed Jamboree Barn where Bill
performed on many occasion.
Bill Monroe gravesite monument
in the Rosine, Cemetary
The Rosine Methodist Church where Bill
attended as a boy and where his funeral
service was held.
The famed "Uncle Pen's Cabin, Uncle Pen
Vandiver was Bill's uncle who he got his
music inspiration from and helped him to
become the famed "Father of Bluegrass"
The song Bill wrote "Uncle Pen" was
written for this man.

Rosine General Store. at Rosine, KY
The grave site of Bill Monroe's mother
  Eric Lewis, right got to perform with Joe Lamay and Sherry Reese from Rochcester, NY at the Rosine Barn.
Eric Lewis, right and Kirby Clark on his left performed at the
second annual bluegrass festival on the stage behind the
house where Bill Monroe was raised and below the famed
Jerusalem Ridge on the Bill Monroe homeplace in Rosine, KY
Labor Day weekend, 2002
Southern Missouri Bluegrass performing warmup
show for Bill Monroe and Jim & Jesse at the
Mountain Music Jubilee at West Plains, Mo 1983
Hwy sign leading into Rosine, KY
The legendary Uncle Pen, this
was Bill Monroe's Uncle Pen
Vandiver, who taught Bill to
play and raised him after his
parents died.

Bed in Bill Monroe childhood home.
Bill Monroe's father's gravesite
Bill's brother Birch Monroe gravesite
How would you like a street named
after you?